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Career Path - Alo Mukerji, VP of Product at Privy banner image

Career Path - Alo Mukerji, VP of Product at Privy

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What do the career path and the day-in-the-life look like for the VP of Product at Privy?

We connected with Alo Mukerji to find out!

Interested in learning more about Privy? Make sure to check out their company page!

Special thanks and photo credit to Ariana Bhargava for taking the awesome photo of her mother in the Masthead!


Where did you grow up?  What did your parents do for work?  

I grew up in Mansfield, MA — known to most as the home of the Great Woods/Xfinity Center. My mom is an accountant and my dad is an IT/Ops tech executive. They both eventually worked for a tech company that did automated payroll for small, local businesses. I spent my high school summers as an intern there. I personally knew many of the businesses, owners, and even employees that we were serving and that's where my passion for helping SMBs started.

Where did you go to college?  What did you study and what were some of your initial jobs out of school?

I went to Columbia University in New York and studied Industrial Engineering with a minor in Economics. I enjoyed every second of it. I went to work for Accenture as a tech consultant just after school and then joined their SAP practice. As the internet bubble hit, I transitioned out of Accenture and worked with several successful startups — first with eRoom Technology (eventually acquired by EMC/Dell) and then Constant Contact.

What has attributed to your success thus far and has helped propel you to the position you have now?

My work is driven by a real, genuine love for small businesses — this has resulted in the relentless customer focus that defines my approach to product development — and I seek out startups and leaders that share these values. Early in my career, I was extremely fortunate to work at growing companies whose CEOs were former product leaders, namely Jeffrey Beir (at eRoom) and Gail Goodman (at Constant Contact). I could not have asked for better role models at this stage in my career. I didn’t realize at that time how much my professional perspectives were shaped by them, specifically the way they approached growth through great customer experiences and believed that a better product leads to efficiencies on everything else — from sales to support. 

Another influential piece of my journey were the consulting stints in between product roles, starting with Accenture. Consulting is an invaluable experience to have in that it pushes you to structure and present problems in a convincing and impactful way. This means knowing your audience and being able to cater to the different ways that people digest information. Applying those skills back into product roles accelerated my understanding of analysis and communication and helped me to get to where I am today.

Alo Mukerji Privy

Can you share the high-level responsibilities of your current position as VP of Product at Privy?

This is the fourth time I’ve joined a company at this stage — where the role entails establishing the product practice and scaling for growth. That means first setting a clear product vision and strategy for a thriving product and then defining the people and processes necessary to execute on that vision for scale. At its core, the challenge is assuring that we are making the right product decisions for our customers and for our business. Prioritization is key. I’ll also be working on pricing initiatives and establishing customer feedback programs - areas that I enjoy immensely.

Any tips for someone considering a career in Product Management?

In my eyes, product management is the very best place to be. You learn every possible skill in an organization: from marketing, to sales, to support. However, you have to enjoy the challenge of making trade-offs and establishing a structure for how to do that. You must have a curiosity about everything from customers to the market. We make really tough decisions all day long and the truth is, you can’t always predict the outcome, but you can do a lot of homework, dig into data, and ask intelligent questions to give yourself the best chance of getting it right. The best outcomes almost always come from looking at the problem from the customer’s perspective first. You have to care deeply about that.

Alo Mukerji Privy


Day in the Life

Coffee, tea, or nothing?

Coke, Coke, and more Coke. I love Coke though I am transitioning to Diet Coke (thanks quarantine), regardless, it’s the best caffeine and I prefer it to even water. 

What time do you get into the office? 

Before quarantine: I so valued getting to drive my teenage daughter to school since it’s one of the few times teens open up — after dropping her, I’d end up getting to work just before 9. 

What are three things that motivate you in your role?

  • Helping small businesses: These are the people and businesses that drive our economy and they are amazing, hard-working people. I love making their lives easier through technology.

  • Values of the leader: You have to believe wholly in the leader. I have known Ben Jabbawy for 10 years. He’s an entrepreneur in and out. Everything he does is about helping SMBs and he goes above and beyond for his team. I am 100% committed to helping him achieve his aspirations for Privy through product.

  • The greater team: You are with your team and extended team for most of the day (albeit remotely now). If you love that experience, it’s the best motivation. Genuinely caring about your team’s individual and collective success is so important. The Privy team is fantastic, we motivate each other.

Every day is different, but can you outline what a typical day looks like for you?

Remote or otherwise, I am in meetings most of the day. It’s the best part of being in product — you need to be connected to every part of the business where you are learning and reacting through different lenses. And then of course more meetings with engineering to insure you are executing. But the best days are the ones where you get to talk to customers to get their perspective on your products and hear about the impact that your products are having on their businesses. 

What time do you head out of the office? 

Before quarantine, I took the commuter rail so it was always dependent on that schedule. Somewhere between 5:30 and 6. 

Do you log back in at night or do you shut it down completely?  

I do log back in on nights and weekends. I really can’t shut down. I don’t like being a bottleneck and try to be on top of it when anyone needs something. Most evenings, I enjoy dinner with my family and then log back in for a bit.

Any productivity hacks?

I try to keep meetings to a minimum on Fridays so I can do uninterrupted work. But it’s good to have at least one day where you are focused on delivering the action items. And though I’m not taking the train right now, I use the morning commute time to think through the day ahead and send myself an email with a checklist. At work, getting out of the office and walking one on ones is very efficient and enjoyable - especially when short on conference room space.

What are the 3 apps that you can’t live without?

All quarantine related. 1) Peloton: I don’t have the bike and it’s still a great product and customer experience - turned me into a fitness fanatic, 2) Netflix: keeps me entertained and sane, 3) Facebook and Linkedin: I’m a people person and social networking keeps me connected especially when I can’t see others face to face.

What professional accomplishment are you proudest of?

The products that I’ve worked on have helped thousands of SMBs and the consumers that they serve. They’ve had a genuine impact on people’s lives especially the new product introductions. That’s incredible. I’ve been so lucky to be a part of these stories.

Secondly, I’ve managed several people on my teams that were new to product management. Helping others and seeing them grow in their products careers and then go on to do amazing things is something that I am exceptionally proud of. Partly because in my own path, that’s what many of my role models did for me.

Who do you admire or call upon for professional advice?

The founders of startups are just the most admirable, courageous people. I’ve been so lucky to work with some of the best, most product-focused ones because they are driven by an absolute desire to help people. Michael Monteiro and Dimitris Georgakopoulos at Buildium, Steve Fredette at Toast, and Ben (Jabbawy at Privy) - they saw a need and built great, valuable products for the SMB market. I am truly inspired at the risks they took, pivots achieved, and the impact these technologies have had in their respective markets. 

As for professional advice, I have two incredible women leaders in my network, Nichole Mace and Diane Swint, that I trust implicitly, admire greatly, and turn to for almost any professional (and personal) advice. We are in similar places in our career trajectories, have similar values, and live in the same town which make it easier to connect. They’ve been my most valuable resource for guidance over many years. Nichole is a fellow product leader and Diane has a broader business view as a GM and CRO. It’s critical to have a strong support group and get the outside perspectives when navigating your path especially in these challenging times.

About the
Company

The email marketing platform for Shopify & Wix stores that need the tools & coaching to grow from $0 to $1 million in sales. Used by 500,000+ small ecommerce brands around the world.

 
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Career Path: Hilary Foley, Director of Customer Operations at Quick Base banner image

Career Path: Hilary Foley, Director of Customer Operations at Quick Base

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What do the career path and the day-in-the-life look like for a Director of Customer Operations at Quick Base?

We connected with Hilary Foley to find out!

Click here for a list of job openings at Quick Base, or check out the right side of this page!


Where did you grow up?  What did your parents do for work?  

I grew up on both coasts. I spent the early years of my childhood living in a small suburb outside of Boston and then my father moved our family out to San Francisco for a job opportunity when I was about seven years old. I grew up on the west coast before returning back to my roots for college.

Along with finding each other, my parents both found success in the corporate world. My father was the CFO of several publicly traded companies and has a track record of helping grow companies from small startups to large publicly traded organizations. My mother is a former executive on the HR side of the house. She specialized in talent acquisition for public relations firms. 

Where did you go to college?  What did you study and what were some of your initial jobs out of school?

I went to Boston College and studied communications, dedicating a great deal of my time to research in health communications. I then went on to spend the early part of my career in the healthcare field, working in the Plastic Surgery Department at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and earning a Master’s of Public Health degree at night. I held multiple roles ranging from the executive assistant for a plastic surgeon who was pioneering the first face transplant program in the US to the division’s financial manager, and finally the physician practice manager before I pivoted to the technology side of healthcare.

Just prior to Quick Base, I held a few roles at athenahealth. I managed a customer success team and built out an operations team, centralizing and scaling programs and processes across athena’s customer success org to support the functions of onboarding, talent management, employee engagement, and knowledge management.        

What has attributed to your success thus far and has helped propel you to the position you have now?

While I enjoy driving transformation and tend geek out over process improvement, above all, I’m passionate about people. People are what bring me to work every day. They inspire me, and enable me to be better than I was yesterday through the thought partnership and breadth of experience they share.

I think that passion for people has translated into the adoption of a servant leadership philosophy. After several years of managing people, I’ve developed my own spin on servant leadership, which has helped me to turn around what were once struggling portions of an organization and convert them to strongholds. By pouring energy into growing genuine relationships with my direct reports and creating a culture of feedback, I’ve been able to build trust and foster environments that have allowed my teams to excel.

In addition to building a foundation of care to drive employee engagement, I’ve also learned that it takes a tremendous amount of discipline to keep a team aligned on all fronts, create visibility into their work, know the performance metrics inside and out, and leverage that data to shape their influence on the business. When you're able to do that, it's really then that you can prove the value of your team.

Hilary Foley Quick Base

Can you share the high-level responsibilities of your current position as Director of Customer Operations at Quickbase?

Customer Operations is a function within our overall GTM Operations and Enablement team. That larger group ensures the GTM org is performing to its best potential, providing business critical insights, creating cross-functional alignment, and driving strategic initiatives to execution.​

The Customer Operations Team is focused on providing a simplified infrastructure to align the highest-level organizational priorities with sound day-to-day operations, drive efficiency across the customer journey and keep all teams engaged on customer retention and revenue growth. 

We recently spearheaded an initiative to get the GTM org grounded in our value selling methodology and buyer-aligned sales process. We’re now continuing to prioritize initiatives that will improve the effectiveness of our GTM org by aligning everything we do with our customers’ needs and their buying process.

Any tips for someone considering a career in your field of work?

Build connections, forge thought partnerships and learn from the experiences that your network of peers and colleagues can share with you. Find a mentor and never stop learning from them. Leverage their insights, get exposure to new areas of the business, try new projects, and expand your breadth of experience. And most importantly, pay that all forward. Share your knowledge and bring others along. 


Day in the Life

Coffee, tea, or nothing?

Boatloads of coffee right up until bedtime.

What time do you get into the office? 

Roughly 7:30am, right about the time the first pot of coffee starts brewing at the office.
 

What are three things that motivate you in your role?

I have a team to lead, an org to support, and processes to improve - all in an effort to positively transform the way we work at Quick Base. 

The team of people I work with at Quick Base are easily some of the best folks I’ve ever worked with throughout my career. What's great about my job, is that the people I work with are also my customers. My customers aren't the paying kind. My customers are the GTM teams at Quick Base. Just like it's their goal to delight their customers, it is my goal to delight all of them, simplify the way they do work, both on their own and in partnership with other teams across the business.

Every day is different, but can you outline what a typical day looks like for you?

Back when we used to go into the office, I'd usually wake up around 5:30am, typically awoken by the sounds of one of my young children who always seem eager to beat the sun up. The early morning is spent getting my family ready for the day and then I’m out the door by 6:45am.

I like to get in to the office early to give myself time to get organized for the day before the chaos ensues - I reorient myself to my top priorities, map out what I want to accomplish that day, finish any prep needed for meetings and continue to plug away at my inbox.

Then, the real fun begins! Colleagues trickle into the office, meetings start, people lob ideas and asks, decisions are made, and the needle moves forward. I think it’s fun, because it often feels like my team is at the epicenter of the action, helping to drive transformation each day. As the business changes, so do the requirements of the infrastructure that support it. My team is in a constant state of change - we react to the evolving needs of the business, transform the underlying infrastructure and processes to support it, and manage the resulting changes across the organization.  There is never a dull moment. 

Then I blink and it's 4pm - time to start wrapping up to get on the road so I can get to daycare on time to pick up my kids! 

Hilary Foley Quick Base

What time do you head out of the office? 

I try to be out the door by 4:30pm so I can get to my second job - parenting 2 young kids :)

Do you log back in at night or do you shut it down completely?  

I log back in - I can't help it. Days in the office fly by, and I need the time at night to get organized again, checking off the action items from all those meetings and getting prepped for tomorrow's line-up.  

Any productivity hacks?

I turn off email notifications to minimize disruptions when I'm trying to do some strategic thinking or focus on executing some project or deliverable

I like old fashioned to-do lists. Nothing quite compares to the feeling of checking off a box on a hand-written to do-list

What are the 3 apps that you can’t live without?

Quick Base (duh!)

Redfin - I'm house hunting right now

Zoom - It's been a lifesaver these days - I can be away from my computer when I need to juggle meetings and the kids without missing a beat. 

What professional accomplishment are you proudest of?

I think employees are the most important piece of any organization and when I reflect on my professional accomplishments, the moments that stand out are the ones in which I was able to help or inspire someone else.

When I first joined Quick Base, I took on a team that presented me with some tough challenges out of the gate as they were struggling with their identity and many had one foot out the door. Those challenges gave me the opportunity to dive in head first, creating a vision, setting goals, and garnering trust to turn that team around. The team had the perception that they were undervalued by the rest of the organization. That prompted me to take a programmatic leadership approach to running that team. I implemented monthly readouts to report on my team's progress against our OKRs, share our success stories and learnings, and iterate on our support model through engaging discussions. These efforts enabled our leadership team to get closer to their work and gave the team a forum in which their voice could be heard and their hard work could be showcased, empowering them to advocate for themselves. As a result, we were able to prove out a strong ROI for our Orientation CSMs and received enthusiastic support to grow that team. We've now tripled the size of that team!

Who do you admire or call upon for professional advice?

I had the privilege of working with Dan McNamara at both athenahealth and Quick Base and can tell you that Dan sets the bar for what it means to be a great leader. Dan has since moved on from Quick Base to the lucky folks at Catalant Technologies, where he serves as VP of their Customer Success org. I say "serves" because Dan is the most genuine servant leader I've known in my career. He truly wants to help people reach their goals and is incredibly successful at motivating his teams. Coming out of a conversation with Dan, I can almost guarantee you will feel re-energized and motivated. He's got a knack for that. He often measures his success in the accomplishments of those he's helped along the way and he'd likely take pride in a situation in which one day he ended up reporting into someone he hired or once managed. He's a great thought leader with a wide breadth of experience to share and an impressive track record of success. For all those reasons, I admire him and continue to call upon him for professional advice.

About the
Company

Unlock the potential of your digital operations with Quickbase's no-code platform.

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Career Path - Grace Arsenault, Senior Brand Storyteller at Rapid7 banner image

Career Path - Grace Arsenault, Senior Brand Storyteller at Rapid7

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What do the career path and the day-in-the-life look like for a Senior Brand Storyteller at Rapid7?

We connected with Grace Arsenault to find out!

Click here for a list of job openings at Rapid7, or check out the right side of this page!


Where did you grow up?  What did your parents do for work?  

I grew up right near Portland, Maine. My mom’s an accountant and multi-media artist and my dad’s a carpenter who golfs and carves — whether it’s in the wood shop or on a snowboard. 

Where did you go to college?  What did you study and what were some of your initial jobs out of school?

I went to Northeastern University in Boston. Northeastern’s co-op program and job placement rate were a huge deciding factor, and it did land me my job at Rapid7. My first co-op (internship) was at EF Education in 2011, and my second was at Rapid7 in 2012. 

I’ve been at Rapid7 for almost eight years now, and, while that’s sometimes met with wide eyes, I always say it’s been like working for at least three companies with how fast we’ve grown. I remember hitting 200 employees soon after I joined and we’re now over 1600. We’ve also gone public (July 2015), opened offices all over the world, and built and acquired incredible additions to our offerings. Paired with that, the culture and standard of leadership have remained consistently open to change and challenge how we do things. 

I started as a PR and Global Communications intern, did some general marketing communications, then taught myself the Adobe suite and pivoted to a graphic design role — that was really challenging and fun. From there I did a lot of work partnering with events and getting more into creative strategy and brand experience. 

Grace Arsenault Rapid7

What has contributed to your success thus far and helped propel you to the position you have now?

First, I have wonderful, supportive, loving family and friends in my corner — they all, in different ways, have helped me through challenges in life and in business. I’m also very lucky to have had the opportunity to go to a shiny private university in a big city. While my student loans are my constant companion, I do think it’s important to note that I started with a pretty significant leg up.

Seizing opportunities when they arise is important, but in my experience, some of the most interesting projects have come from looking for gaps to fill. Said another way, if you seize what comes to you, you can be a successful part of someone else’s plan, but if you find opportunities, too, you start to carve out your own path. That’s always been exciting to me. Of course, this goes along with making sure existing work is outstanding and that those opportunities are in my wheelhouse. It’s never an easy undertaking — a lot of extra time and energy — but, for me these projects have been some of the most rewarding and showed a breadth of interest and ability outside my, “job description.”

The flipside of that was learning to frame patience, which I’ve never had much of, with learning. Career trajectory isn’t linear, even though it feels like the effort you’re putting in is consistent. In those times between the big opportunities or when it feels like things are becoming stagnant, a mentor helped me to see the valuable lessons I was learning — about myself, work relationships, business in general — in those moments instead of letting frustration stew. 

Can you share the high-level responsibilities of your current position as Sr. Brand Storyteller at Rapid7?

I’m responsible for crafting the engaging, human parts of the brand. The connective tissue between how we talk about our technology and what allows customers to build a relationship with Rapid7. That includes a lot of complex planning, research, and writing, as well as concepting and pitching ways we can show, not just tell, the brand story. It’s a new role to me and to the business, so right now the cocktail is equal parts challenge and potential.

Any tips for someone considering a career in brand and experiential design?

Get as much broad experience as you can. I’ve always been both creative and analytical, and it’s gone a long way to be able to brainstorm creative and talk logistics or product. To have an out-there, imaginative idea and do the planning and organization to execute it. If you have one more strongly, I’d say really push yourself to strengthen the other.

Be solution oriented. Pretty much anyone can look at something and tell you what’s wrong, what’s not working. That doesn’t exactly make you an asset to a team — and we’ve all been there. If you see something — whether it’s a clunky process or the size of a type face — try adopting a default on fixing or improving it. This sets you up to find those gaps and turn them into opportunities, teaches you to give better feedback, and generally makes you a more productive, positive person to be around.

Backing all of this up is communication, communication, communication. Storytelling and writing are modes of communication, yes, but to influence the brand and work with other teams, interpersonal skills are huge. Even great solutions or ideas delivered without tact and timing will go nowhere.


Day in the Life

Coffee, tea, or nothing?

Right now, my go-to is coffee with oat milk and a little squeeze of honey. I’ll order a dirty chai once a week or so, when I need an extra pick-me-up. 

What time do you get into the office? 

8:30-9ish, depending on meetings and if I fit in a workout.

What are three things that motivate you in your role?

We’re aligned around a powerful mission to create great experiences for customers and shape the future of security. I have the opportunity to craft our brand to communicate that mission, build those relationships, and help make security accessible. It’s daunting, and the challenge pushes me to put my best into it.  

Deadlines! I mean, it’s just reality that pressure and expectations get things done. Especially other people’s expectations, or my perception of their expectations and my drive to exceed them. Either way, but sometimes it really is just a deadline.

I have some career crushes that I follow on social, read their books, tuck away inspiration. I used to constantly compare myself against other people’s success, especially women — tale as old as time and I’m still working to break the habit. Rebranding that, so to speak, from socially reinforced jealousy into what I call, “career crushes,” puts that energy to a much better use. A career crush feels more friendly, positive, and supportive than defaulting to envy. Anyway, they motivate and inspire me to be better. 

Every day is different, but can you outline what a typical day looks like for you?

I review my calendar before bed to mentally prepare — do I have any important meetings? Time blocked off to do writing and creative? It’ll inform what time I get started, if I schedule a workout to get psyched, what I choose to wear. 

On my AM Commute, I’m listening to either a business podcast or Audible book or my playlist for that season, again depending on the day ahead. When I get in, it’s coffee, oatmeal with a spoonful of peanut butter, catching up with my team, and checking on emails or rewriting my to-do list.

For the rest of the day it’s a mix of weekly check-ins with various teams, project updates, and the occasional brainstorm. When I’m not in meetings I’ve got headphones in while planning, writing, or designing — at my desk or perched somewhere around the office.

On the way home I’ll grab a few groceries or Thai takeout, and listen to a non-biz audible book, music again, or call home to check in. 

Grace Arsenault Rapid7

How has your routine changed in quarantine? 

I seem to need more sleep lately, so I let myself off the hook if getting out of bed is hard. It took a while to have the right energy to work out, too, so I’m happy now to enjoy a good sweat a few times a week — I’ll catch an Everybody Fights live class or do my own medley of yoga/strength/dance/stretch. To feel put together enough to be productive, I need to shower and get fully dressed, with shoes. Yes, sometimes it’s sweats and sneakers, but staying in slippers makes me feel sleepy. Without a commute, I’m listening to fewer podcasts and reading more books.

Zoom makes meetings feel relatively normal. Back in March, I beat myself up a bit for sometimes not sustaining capital-P Productivity all day, but in a creative role, inspiration doesn’t always strike. Off days happen whether you’re in the office or not. I’m very lucky to be able to stay home, and I’m quarantining with my grandmother, who’s ninety. There are always a few pauses to have a chat, help with reaching or carrying things, or grab snacks. We play cards and watch Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy every night, so that provides a nice natural end to my workdays.

What time do you head out of the office? 

Around six most nights.

Do you log back in at night or do you shut it down completely?  

I try to keep it separate, but if I’m working on a deadline, I’ll be online late. Or if I have a project out for feedback, I’ll keep an eye on Slack notifications.

Any productivity hacks?

For any creative block, lately I’ve been turning to hitrecord.org for a change of pace. I love the Tiny Story prompts for a super focused, bite-size challenge. I’ll also switch up the medium if the ideas aren’t flowing — staring at a blank doc? Get out paper and some markers. Struggling to make a slide presentation flow? Start with a written outline. 

I’ll also adjust my music depending on the task. I thought my Deep Productivity playlist was very clever, but I realized recently that it’s literally just Hans Zimmer soundtracks. Lighter copywriting gets something like Gershwin or Steve Aoki radio. If I’m doing more visual work, I can listen to music with lyrics — I start a new playlist each season to keep it fresh. I like that I can go back to, say, Summer 2016, and it’s like opening a time capsule.

What are the 3 apps that you can’t live without?

Outside of the necessary work apps, it’s Instagram and Spotify for sure. Third is probably The RealReal app. For a few years I’ve shopped mostly consignment, vintage, and thrift in an effort to make my clothing consumption more sustainable. Looking for great pieces, even if I don’t buy them, is a relaxing treasure hunt for me.

What professional accomplishment are you proudest of?

There are a few that stand out to me — designing ads for Times Square when Rapid7 went public, working with a NY-based company, Luster, on interactive displays to engage people at our trade shows, partnering with our leadership team on their presentations. 

Most recently, I wrote the pitches for external speakers at our kickoff in January. Our team talked through a bunch of amazing names and, based on the theme of the show and knowing the story he could tell, I advocated for Leslie Odom Jr. to be our keynote. We ended up signing him, and I crafted the interview questions, recommended the songs he performed, and, ultimately, co-hosted the conversation with Leslie alongside our Chief People Officer, Christina Luconi. From beginning to end, it was an incredible experience, I learned so much, and it was massively rewarding to get the feedback on how well his story resonated.

Who do you admire or call upon for professional advice?

The aforementioned family and friends, of course. I’m also fortunate that my career path has crossed with a lot of brilliant, strong women, a few of whom I consider close advisors, mentors, and friends. Most of my career has been carving my own route, with some admittedly imaginary-sounding titles along the way. I’ve definitely needed support, and in times where there’s not a “right” answer, consulting diverse opinions has helped me to find center.


Want to learn more about Rapid7? Check out their BIZZPage

About the
Company

With Rapid7 technology, services, and research, organizations around the globe can break down barriers, accelerate innovation, and securely advance.

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Career Path: Kyle Larkin, Sales Engineer at JRNI banner image

Career Path: Kyle Larkin, Sales Engineer at JRNI

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Meet Kyle Larkin, Sales Engineer in Boston, who has turned his love for technology and customer service into a successful career. We sat down to learn more about Kyle’s journey to JRNI, his personal interests, and more.

Click here for a list of job openings at JRNI, or check out the right side of this page!


Give us an overview of your professional experience.

I have had a bit of a winding road after graduating college with a degree in economics, and no clear direction on what I wanted to do. Post-grad, I spent over 2 years in the recruiting and staffing world where I found success, but no passion for what I was doing. In my last recruiting role, I implemented an applicant tracking software program for the company, and I became enamored with the idea of a role in that field. Shortly after discovering this passion, I switched careers and I spent 2 years in a staffing software implementations job working with some of the largest staffing firms in the world. It was a challenging job as the majority of projects were taking firms off their very outdated homegrown systems, and setting up the company on a SaaS-based product.

While the work itself was incredibly rewarding, it was a remote job where I was rarely interacting with my project team in person. To me, a team's best work is done when they have opportunities to get together in a room and solve problems, and I missed having that experience. So, I decided to reassess my job opportunities and came across JRNI.

JRNI’s Boston based office solved my biggest issue, and the Sales Engineer role is a perfect blend of my previous two positions. I get to engage with prospective customers, explain and clarify our product, and construct tailored solutions that meet the needs of every customer.

What’s one of your biggest accomplishments so far in your career at JRNI?

Aside from winning the initial QuaretineKing competition (a game competition between myself and my coworkers during the quarantine), my biggest accomplishment has been taking my first client from the initial demo all the way through to signing off on the statement of work. It was such a fantastic feeling getting the signed papers back. I think that feeling will be the same for all clients in the future!

What’s the most rewarding part about working at JRNI?

The most rewarding part about JRNI is the people I work with. In the new (temporary) reality that is coronavirus, it’s easy for companies to close up shop and hope this blows over soon. That’s not the case at JRNI. Everyone here is striving to provide the best customer service possible for our existing clients while continuing to schedule virtual meetings and demos with prospective customers who know that this pandemic will pass. It’s inspiring to see the level of effort our team is expanding, and JRNI will come out of this historic time stronger than ever.

What’s your favorite part of working with customers?

Every customer is so unique! Coming in, I assumed that many of the opportunities I would be working on would be somewhat similar. However, I’ve found that each customer has their own little twist when it comes to their vision for a partnership with JRNI. Working with the customers to solve these questions within the expansive structure of the platform is the most exciting thing about the role. It gives me the ability to construct a unique and customized solution that delivers a great end product to the customer.

If you had to pick one, what’s your favorite memory at JRNI so far?

There are so many to choose from, but my favorite memory at JRNI was traveling to London to meet with our team for training and information sessions. It was an amazing experience getting to meet all our other team members there who work so hard to build this company (and international travel wasn’t a bad perk either!).

Tell us a little about JRNI’s culture. What’s your favorite part about it?

My favorite part of JRNI’s culture is just how many people here help when others need it. On a daily basis, you will see everyone pitching in where their expertise is needed, even if it doesn’t fall within their job requirements. In short, there are no silos, and that attitude and community approach is necessary for a company to thrive in a knowledge-driven world.

Non-work related, do you have any hobbies you’re passionate about?

Attending live concerts at small venues is a passion of mine. You get the intimate experience you don’t get at a stadium show with the added benefit of potentially seeing an up-and-coming artist. I also love sports, specifically football. You can find me every Sunday during football season at the Harp, a local Boston bar, cheering on the Buffalo Bills!

If you could visit anywhere in the world, where would you go?

South Africa for a safari!

One last question, where do you see JRNI growing from here?

The sky's the limit. JRNI has already established itself in the space as an industry leader, and the team in place is taking market share at a tremendous rate. As we continue to grow the company and add passionate people with new voices and perspectives, that growth will only accelerate. JRNI will continue to be the premier provider of scheduling solutions for enterprise-scale clients.


Interested in working alongside Kyle and the rest of the JRNI team? Check out their current open roles and #jointhejrni!

About the
Company

JRNI is an enterprise SaaS scheduling platform for personalizing and optimizing the customer journey.

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Career Path: Hannah Dalke, Manager of Product Management at LogMeIn (LastPass) banner image

Career Path: Hannah Dalke, Manager of Product Management at LogMeIn (LastPass)

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What do the career path and the day-in-the-life look like for a Manager of Product Management at LogMeIn?

We connected with Hannah Dalke to find out!

Click here for a list of job openings at LogMeIn, or check out the right side of this page!


Where did you grow up?  What did your parents do for work?  

I grew up in Shrewsbury, MA. My mom is a realtor in Central Mass. My dad was a Director of Software Engineering (he is now retired and a self-proclaimed “Director of Life Experiences”). 

Where did you go to college?  What did you study and what were some of your initial jobs out of school?

I went to Bryant University in Smithfield, Rhode Island where I studied International Management with a minor in French. 

During college, I was a product intern at TripAdvisor. After college, I joined TripAdvisor full-time as part of their 2-year Product & Marketing Rotation Program, and then became a Product Manager on their User Engagement Team. 

I left TripAdvisor in 2016 and have been at LogMeIn ever since - starting as a PM on join.me before moving over to LastPass in 2017. Over the past year, I have transitioned into managing other PMs, while also still being a PM working directly with engineering teams.

What has attributed to your success thus far and has helped propel you to the position you have now?

There are two big things that have helped me get to where I am today.

  1. First, building a strong network of people I can trust (and who are smarter than me!). I can’t tell you how many times I have reached out to old co-workers asking for advice or just to bounce ideas around - whether it be “what should my next career move be?” or just “hey, what do you think about this idea I have?”. It’s super helpful to be able to get an outsider’s perspective. 

  2. Second, not being afraid to ask for more responsibility. In product management, there is always going to be some cool new project that needs a good leader on it, so why not ask to be that person! Worst case scenario, I’ll be told “no”, but in most cases, taking the initiative to ask for more responsibility tends to lead to more success (or at least more opportunities to learn). 

Can you share the high-level responsibilities of your current position as Manager of Product Management at LogMeIn?

At a very high level, I am responsible for helping to define and communicate both the short-term and long-term strategy for LastPass. I work directly with my dev teams to define, document, prioritize, and execute all product requirements on our roadmap. External to my dev teams, I am the liaison between engineering and all other stakeholders to ensure the smooth release of any new product (this includes working directly with teams such as UX/Research, Product Marketing, Sales, Support, Care, Analytics, etc). As a manager, I also have direct reports who I am responsible for. 

Any tips for someone considering a career in Product Management?

I honestly think finding someone with the right personality and attitude is more important than finding someone who has formal training when it comes to Product Management. The best product managers I’ve worked with are those who are well organized and confident in their decision making. 

While I went to school for International Management, I never took any courses specific to Product Management. I’ve learned everything I know by watching other more experienced product managers and copying them! 


Day in the Life

Coffee, tea, or nothing?

Both! LogMeIn has an awesome cafe, so every morning you’ll see me with an iced tea in one hand and a latte in the other. 

What time do you get into the office? 

Typically around 8:30am

What are three things that motivate you in your role?

My engineering teams! They are the ones who deserve all the credit. I love that I can come up with an idea and within a few days, my engineering teams can make those ideas become a reality. 

Seeing the impact my releases have on our customers (which in turn positively impacts LastPass as a business). I love that as soon as a new product is released to our customers, I can immediately track its usage and see how it is performing. For the first few days after a big release goes out, you are likely to see me refreshing my Amplitude Dashboards every 5 minutes!

Hearing someone yell on the street “I love LastPass!” when I’m wearing a LastPass shirt - it happened just the week

Every day is different, but can you outline what a typical day looks like for you?

I hate to say it, but I always start my day by checking Slack before heading to the gym. I work with an engineering team based in Budapest, Hungary (+6 hours ahead of Boston), so I try to make sure I’m not blocking them on anything during their workday. 

Once I get into the office, the majority of my mornings are spent in meetings with my coworkers in Budapest - whether it be a sprint planning meeting, technical refinements, design meetings, weekly update meetings, etc. I also have a quick 15 minute standup with my engineering team every morning. 

The afternoons are when most of my actual work gets done. By that time, my coworkers in Budapest have gone home for the day, so I can focus on planning upcoming projects and analyzing results from recent releases. 

After work, you’ll usually find me trying out a new restaurant in Boston or cooking something at my apartment. 

What time do you head out of the office? 

Usually between 5:00 and 5:30pm 

Do you log back in at night or do you shut it down completely?  

I have slack on my phone, but I’ll typically only check messages sent directly to me at night. 

Any productivity hacks?

Put together a Release Plan for every project outlining the high level scope of the project and timing of the release (without any of the granular technical details). At LastPass, our releases impact so many other teams (Product Marketing, Sales, Support, Customer Care, Demand Gen, Documentation) so it makes it super easy to keep everyone up-to-date by just sharing out this Release Plan with them. Plus, (pro tip!) you won’t have to give the same update over and over again. 

What are the 3 apps that you can’t live without?

  • LastPass (!!!!) - Really though, I use LastPass every single day, multiple times a day, and not just because it’s my job. The only password I still know is my master password to my LastPass account. 

  • Uber/Lyft - I don’t have a car so Uber/Lyft is crucial if I need to get anywhere quickly

  • Vivino - So that I never mistakenly buy a bad bottle of wine :) 

What professional accomplishment are you proudest of?

My proudest accomplishment to date was my involvement in a recent SaaS acquisition for LastPass. I was able to lead the product side of this acquisition from the initial market research proposal, to meeting with all potential companies, and performing due diligence on our top targets. Once the acquisition closed, I led the product integration of the newly acquired technology into our existing LastPass ecosystem. Within 4 months of closing the acquisition, we were able to launch three entirely new product offerings to our customers!


Want to learn more about LogMeIn? Check out their BIZZPage

About the
Company

At LogMeIn, Inc., we build category-defining products that unlock the potential of the modern workforce, making it possible for millions of people and businesses around the globe do their best work, whenever, however, and most importantly, wherever.

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Career Path: Lindsey Riordan, Senior Sales Executive at Drift banner image

Career Path: Lindsey Riordan, Senior Sales Executive at Drift

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What do the career path and the day-in-the-life look like for a Senior Sales Executive at Drift?

We connected with Lindsey Riordan to find out!

Click here for a list of job openings at Drift, or check out the right side of this page!


Where did you grow up?  What did your parents do for work?  

I grew up in Woodbury, CT.  My dad has a land surveying business.

Where did you go to college?  What did you study and what were some of your initial jobs out of school?

I went to UConn (University of Connecticut) where I studied Psychology.  Right out of school I worked at Wellspring, which is a residential place for teenage girls with mental health needs.  After that, I worked at a KinderCare as a preschool teacher!

What has attributed to your success thus far and has helped propel you to the position you have now?

I would say my work ethic, creativity, and competitive nature have all definitely helped propel me to where I am now. 

Can you share the high-level responsibilities of your current position as a Senior Sales Executive at Drift?

My high-level responsibilities as a Senior Sales Exec at Drift are currently booking demos through Drift Video, running demos, maintaining pipeline and follow-up, and helping colleagues.

Any tips for someone considering a career in Sales?

There are always going to be things to get better at and if you always have the desire to learn and put your ego away you can succeed at sales. You also need to work REALLY hard and it will pay off!


Day in the Life

Coffee, tea, or nothing?

Water

What time do you get into the office? 

I get in around 8:45 AM.

What are three things that motivate you in your role?

My team, our mission of helping companies change how they interact with their prospects and customers, and my desire to win.

Every day is different, but can you outline what a typical day looks like for you?

Each day is different but a typical day looks like this - I start the day with prospecting in the morning and looking for new accounts. I’ll typically have a couple calls throughout the day, and then reach out to existing pipeline and prospect more if I have time before I leave or if I am feeling behind.

What time do you head out of the office? 

I try to head out around 6:00 PM. 

Do you log back in at night or do you shut it down completely?  

Shut it down usually.

Any productivity hacks?

Drift’s App - At Drift we are big believers in “drinking our own champagne” so we use all the tools we offer to our customers in our day to day as well. Our app is amazing because I love knowing which one of my potential customers were on the website and reaching out to them in a relevant and meaningful way. It’s been a gamechanger in how we’re able to personalize our outreach and make connections with future customers!

What are the 3 apps that you can’t live without?

Candy Crush, Uber, Mail

What professional accomplishment are you proudest of?

My proudest professional accomplishment to date was when I was awarded the “Stay Scrappy” award at Drift. At Drift we have eight Leadership Principles that guide us, and one of them is to “stay scrappy” and work like we have something to prove. This quality helps us overcome challenges we encounter regardless of means or circumstances. Every year our leadership team recognizes eight individuals who represent and embody each one of our guiding principles. The winners receive an award with their principle on it and a ticket to our Leadership Circle tropical vacation. That was an awesome moment for me.


Want to learn more about Drift? Check out their BIZZPage

About the
Company

Drift is the new way businesses buy from businesses.

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Career Path - Zach Baharozian, Payments Strategy Manager at Toast banner image

Career Path - Zach Baharozian, Payments Strategy Manager at Toast

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What do the career path and the day-in-the-life look like for a Payments Strategy Manager at Toast?

We connected with Zach Baharozian to find out!

Click here for a list of job openings at Toast, or check out the right side of this page!


Where did you grow up?  What did your parents do for work?  

  • I grew up in Westford, MA

  • My parents own their own eyecare practice in Westford - My Dad Dwayne is the head doctor, and my Mom Christine runs the business side of the practice. 

Where did you go to college?  What did you study and what were some of your initial jobs out of school?

  • I went to the University of Michigan (Go Blue!)

  • I studied pure mathematics, with a focus on financial math & risk management.

  • Prior to Toast, I worked within the management consulting arm of Fidelity Investments, partnering with Fidelity’s leaders on some of the most important strategic decisions the company faced.

Zach Baharozian Toast

What has attributed to your success thus far and has helped propel you to the position you have now?

I truly believe that being able to watch my parents operate a small business my whole life has really helped find success in an environment such as Toast. When you’re a small business owner, there is no real distinction between “job” and “life.”Observing the effort my parents have put into their practice over the course of my life gave me an incredible awareness of how much hard work is required to succeed.

I also attribute success to a childhood of team sports and competition. Sports helped me foster a deep competitive drive and willingness to “win” in any competitive forum. More important than pure competition, however, is a sense of team - success shouldn’t come at the expense of teammates or allies. Team sports showed me the value of a strong team all competing for the same outcome as one connected group. At Toast, I feel incredibly lucky to be a part of a rockstar Payments Team, and we all share the same drive to “win” the POS & payments markets for Toast. When you’re a part of a great team and you believe in the mission of your company, work becomes fun in a hurry.

Can you share the high-level responsibilities of your current position as Payments Strategy Manager at Toast?

The Payments Team at Toast is responsible for implementing and maintaining the business practices Toast’s payments products. My team, the Payments Strategy Team, designs, executes, and implements the most pressing cross-functional projects related to Payments. These projects can range significantly, from optimizing our payments go-to-market strategies and positioning, to internal process design and optimization. Personally, I get to wear lots of hats in my role, which I find exciting - my role is some combination of operations work, marketing, competitive intelligence, data analysis, product work, and Sales enablement.


Day in the Life

Coffee, tea, or nothing?

Coffee is a must

What time do you get into the office? 

Right around 8 am, give or take a few minutes depending on traffic.

What are three things that motivate you in your role?

  • Autonomy - I am given lots of autonomy to execute my projects in the best manner I see fit. Having that freedom to approach and solve business problems in my way is very rewarding, and is something I don’t take for granted.

  • The pace of Toast - at Toast, everything moves at hyperspeed. This pace really speaks to me, as I enjoy being a part of high-stakes and action-oriented environments.

  • My team / the talent at Toast - Toast is a collection of smart and driven folks working towards the same goal - to empower and better serve the restaurant community through technology and services. Working with such talented people continually inspires me to always be delivering impact.

Every day is different, but can you outline what a typical day looks like for you?

Every day is certainly different! I manage 5+ projects at any given moment, so the day is often dictated by the projects with the most pressing needs at that time. My days are primarily filled with lots of meetings with all the different stakeholders of those 5+ projects, looking for free time to keep getting work done, and lots of caffeine. 

Any productivity hacks?

Honestly, I track everything I do with my projects through Microsoft OneNote - I find it incredibly helpful to stay as organized as possible.

I firmly believe that taking 30-60 minutes a day to exercise really helps me stay mentally sharp and productive. I love going to the gym to refresh mentally and get some time to myself.

What are the 3 apps that you can’t live without?

  • Powerpoint - Anyone that works with me knows how much I value clear and concise messaging. Powerpoint is my favorite medium to deliver messaging - definitely a consequence of management consulting.

  • Slack -  Slack is an awesome messaging platform - definitely the best I have ever used.

  • OneNote - As mentioned before, I track everything I do via OneNote.

What professional accomplishment are you proudest of?

In January, I had the opportunity to present an overview of Toast’s Payments business at our annual all-company January gathering called Kickoff. It was humbling to be able to represent the team at the company’s biggest event of the year, and I thoroughly enjoyed delivering the presentation. Toast Payments has some major developments happening in 2020!

Who do you admire or call upon for professional advice?

Definitely my parents, as they’ve seen everything over the years with their business. 


Want to learn more about Toast? Check out their BIZZPage

About the
Company

We empower the restaurant community to delight guests, do what they love, and thrive.

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Career Path - Ryan Tengler, Product Designer at Yesware banner image

Career Path - Ryan Tengler, Product Designer at Yesware

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What do the career path and the day-in-the-life look like for a Product Designer at Yesware?

We connected with Ryan Tengler to find out!

Click here for a list of job openings at Yesware, or check out the right side of this page!


Where did you grow up?  What did your parents do for work?  

I spent most of my younger years growing up in a small town about 45 minutes outside of Boston. It was about as rural as you get for being so close to the city. When my brother and I were born my mom left her line of work to focus on spending more time with us, while my dad continued to work as an entrepreneur in the software and restaurant industries. 

Where did you go to college?  What did you study and what were some of your initial jobs out of school?

"People always make the difference" — when I think back to my college experience and selection process, I always think back to this one mantra. It was something my dad would repeat to me throughout my childhood, and a belief I carry with me to this day. It would be a lie to say anything other than feeling helplessly lost when applying to colleges and trying to decide in that moment what I wanted from my life, which led me to apply to a comical number of universities just to buy me some time as I attempted to figure it out. I eventually landed at Bryant University for a number of reasons, but one of which being the people and professors I met when visiting.

Throughout my time there I continued to explore and discover my interests in part by introducing myself to the professors and department heads that seemed most passionate and excited about their field of work. This ultimately led to several wonderful mentorships and segways into extracurricular projects that shaped a meaningful part of my college journey, culminating in a degree that was largely focused on entrepreneurial studies, communication, and sociology. 

After graduating I came right to Yesware as a sales enablement intern. I was fortunate enough to join its younger years as a startup where the potential of carving your own path is slightly greater. As an intern I was able to divide my focus amongst a variety of projects that spanned departments and allowed me to learn from many people at once. And it was at this time that I learned about something that Yesware does brilliantly — if for a moment you thought of each job I had as an intern as an individual food item, I was allowed to fill up my plate with as many different foods as I wanted, then slowly pair back to only the foods that I enjoyed the most. It was this approach that allowed me to explore adding value to various parts of the business while simultaneously discovering areas of natural interest that I gravitated towards and wanted to pursue. This model has led to a few different career jumps so far at Yesware, starting with sales enablement intern, to sales engineer, to managing our customizations process, to now, a product designer! 

What has attributed to your success thus far and has helped propel you to the position you have now?

People, and the collective growth mindset of Yesware. One of Yesware’s biggest strengths is their dedication to supporting their employees, and over the years I think we’ve cultivated an amazing cohort of individuals that deeply share this mentality and do their best to help others succeed. 

Can you share the high-level responsibilities of your current position as product designer at Yesware?

My main responsibility as a product designer is to think critically about the user experience and design solutions that generate as much value and excitement for our customers as possible. Achieving this includes a fair amount of ideation and user research as the design process evolves from scribbly sketches to a pixel-perfect mockups that our engineers then bring to life. 

Any tips for someone considering a career in product design?

I would encourage them to speak with as many people as possible in the design field beforehand, and should they decide to move forward in this career path, be relentless about asking for constructive feedback at every turn. As I didn’t get a formal education in product design, or any other forms of design for that matter, learning from other’s feedback has been my greatest source of improvement. 


Day in the Life

Coffee, tea, or nothing?

Usually tea. Though recently I’ve befriended a former Blue Bottle employee that’s been super generous with some free, delicious coffee. 

What time do you get into the office? 

Usually between 9:00 and 9:30.

What are three things that motivate you in your role?

Making a genuine difference in the daily lives of our users, working through difficult product challenges, and being free to express creativity in multiple forms. 

Every day is different, but can you outline what a typical day looks like for you?

Every day typically consists of a handful of meetings and team ceremonies, along with providing feedback to engineers on projects involving UI/UX work, and working through various stages of the design process depending on the size and scope of any given project. 

What time do you head out of the office? 

Typically around 5:30.

Do you log back in at night or do you shut it down completely?  

I usually shut it down. I’ve been trying to do a better job at keeping a steady work/life balance and spending energy elsewhere outside of work. 

Any productivity hacks?

I intermittently put my phone on airplane mode throughout the day, especially if I’m trying to focus on a large task. Highly recommend if you have a bad habit of checking your phone.

What are the 3 apps that you can’t live without?

1Password, Google Maps, and WhatsApp. 

What professional accomplishment are you proudest of?

In my former role as a sales engineer, my main responsibility was to help customers better leverage and tell stories with the data we capture on their behalf. Throughout the two years I spent in that role, I was able to work with our largest customers and spend time with their sales leaders to deeply learn and understand their most pressing goals and needs, and work with them to drive those goals forward in ways they could only do with a tool like Yesware. It felt great knowing that I could make such a meaningful difference to our customers. 

Who do you admire or call upon for professional advice?

My parents are my greatest heros. My mom just celebrated her 36th anniversary as a stage 4 cancer survivor, and my dad is one of those people you’d never forget even if you just met him for a couple of minutes — he has this aura of energy and positivity around him that’s both infectious and grounding. Together they’ve taught me the value of positive persistence, believing in people, and always leading with a positive attitude. Whether I’m seeking professional or personal advice, they’re always my first call.


Want to learn more about Yesware? Check out their BIZZPage

About the
Company

Yesware is your all-in-one toolkit for sales professionals and sales teams.

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Career Path: Orlatha Duffy, Software Development Manager at Chewy banner image

Career Path: Orlatha Duffy, Software Development Manager at Chewy

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What do the career path and the day-in-the-life look like for a Software Development Manager at Chewy?

We connected with Orlatha Duffy to find out!

Click here for a list of job openings at Chewy, or check out the right side of this page!


Where did you grow up? What did your parents do for work?

Belfast, Northern Ireland. My mother was an Irish step dancing teacher and my father was a professor in mechanical engineering.

Where did you go to college? What did you study and what were some of your initial jobs out of school?

The University of Ulster, Coleraine, Northern Ireland. Computer Science, I did an internship for 15 months during the third year of my degree at Microsoft and went back to work there after graduating.

What has attributed to your success thus far and has helped propel you to the position you have now?

A strong work ethic instilled by my parents at a young age and a belief that everyone deserves a chance if you are willing to work hard.

Can you share the high-level responsibilities of your current position as a Software Development Manager at Chewy?

I currently manage the technical CMS, Accessibility and SEO teams at Chewy.  We work in an agile environment and I manage all ceremonies as well as all projects for my teams.  I work closely with the product and business teams on our initiatives. 

Any tips for someone considering a career in Engineering?

Keep an open mind, learn as much as you can from the people around you and always strive to do your best.  Never be afraid to ask questions or listen to other's advice/opinions.


Day in the Life

Coffee, tea, or nothing?

Tea all day, every day!!

What time do you get into the office?

Between 8-9am

What are three things that motivate you in your role?

Team members and striving to do the best that I can for them.  Helping people and being an integral part of our A11Y (accessibility team) making strides to make our site accessible for everyone including people with disabilities.

Every day is different, but can you outline what a typical day looks like for you?

Every day is different, stand up’s, roadmap discussions, 1 on 1’s with team members, working through issues that arise, never a dull moment, we work in a very fast paced environment.

What time do you head out of the office?

Between 5-6pm

Do you log back in at night or do you shut it down completely?

Typically log back in at night or follow slack but I like to shut it down completely when I can.

Any productivity hacks?

Learn to multi-task and do it well….

What are the 3 apps that you can’t live without?

Chewy, Music & Whatsapp (connecting with family)

Who do you admire or call upon for professional advice?

I have a few bosses from previous roles that I now call friends and consult with them for advice.


Want to learn more about Chewy? Check out their BIZZPage

About the
Company

Our mission is to be the most trusted and convenient online destination for pet parents everywhere. We believe that we are the preeminent online source for pet products, supplies and prescriptions as a result of our broad selection of high-quality products, which we offer at competitive prices and deliver with an exceptional level of care and a personal touch. We continually develop innovative ways for our customers to engage with us, and partner with more than 1,800 of the best and most trusted brands in the pet industry to bring a high-bar, customer-centric experience to our customers.

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Career Path: Jack Downey, Enterprise Account Executive at SmartBear

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What do the career path and the day-in-the-life look like for an Enterprise Account Executive at SmartBear?

We connected with Jack Downey to find out!

Click here for a list of job openings at SmartBear, or check out the right side of this page!


Where did you grow up?  What did your parents do for work?  

I grew up in Framingham Massachusetts, about a half-hour away from Boston. My Mom is a school teacher and my Dad is also in Sales like myself. Specifically HR Benefits. 

Where did you go to college?  What did you study and what were some of your initial jobs out of school?

I went to college at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. I studied “Management Engineering” which combined some science with a core business degree. I actually had a sales internship at the Mathworks during school, and always wanted to pursue B2B sales once getting into my degree. After graduating I immediately started here at SmartBear, June 2015.

What has attributed to your success thus far and has helped propel you to the position you have now?

Having a routine and taking value in your time is the number 1 catalyst to being successful in sales. Time is your most important asset. I attribute learning these concepts from the leaders I had in my life both personally (my dad) and the people I met at SmartBear (manager-level, director, peers). Being open, curious, and coming in with a positive attitude has made climbing the “success ladder” feel almost effortless. 

Can you share the high-level responsibilities of your current position as Strategic Account Manager at Smartbear?

The “SAM” role at SmartBear includes being an account manager (main point of contact) for a set list of SmartBear’s highest spending clients. I have 15 accounts whom I maintain relationships with and help build out SmartBear’s technology portfolio (17 different tools!) where it fits best through my clients. It is my job to grow and maintain our top customers.  

Any tips for someone considering a career in Sales?

Don’t be afraid of failure, embrace it, do your best to reflect why, and then quickly move on. Everyone fails at some point in Sales, it's part of the game

From the previous answer; Time is your most important asset. Always assess how you spend your time on a day-to-day (build a routine)

LISTEN. Listen to your peers, Listen to your management, most importantly listen to your customers. Customers have full control nowadays, all information at hand. You will build trust from being able to understand exactly what a customer is saying, and providing your best recommendation (which should inevitably lead to a sale)


Day in the Life

Coffee, tea, or nothing?

Coffee at least 2. But lately I have been enjoying Yerba Mate tea.

What time do you get into the office? 

7:45 - 8:15

What are three things that motivate you in your role?

Money (duh), Competition, and learning something new every day. Being in the tech space, always something new around the corner, and specifically with our top clients.

Every day is different, but can you outline what a typical day looks like for you?

- Sit in seat and open email for 5 minutes

- Coffee, eggs, cereal/banana

- Mentally walk through the calendar for the day

- Comb through any leads

- Comb through internal expectations I’ve set for different deals

- Maybe gym around lunch

- Complete a goal set for day (open opp, get a cold meeting, etc)

- rinse, repeat.

What time do you head out of the office? 

6-6:30

Do you log back in at night or do you shut it down completely?  

Definitely depends. I am an email addict and have it on my phone, so I am always tapped in in that regard. Typically I leave my laptop in the bag, unless it's EOQ  :) 

Any productivity hacks?

Eat breakfast, set a consistent routine,  end your day with planning tomorrow. 

What are the 3 apps that you can’t live without?

Uber/Lyft, Robinhood, Reddit

What professional accomplishment are you proudest of?

Consistently being able to visit customers and do large presentations with no longer being nervous. I’ve now done over 12 Customer visits the past year, which was brand new to me. Also being able to close the largest deal in company history this past September, but who knows how long that will be “the largest” (We’re blowing up!)

Who do you admire or call upon for professional advice?

 My Dad. He is in the same profession as I am and he always seems to know what is going to happen two-three steps down the road. He has an intangible knack for foresight, and gives great advice -  Thanks Mike Downey!

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Company

6+ million software professionals and 20,000+ companies in 194 countries use SmartBear products to build and deliver the world’s greatest applications.

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