Learn how professionals in the tech
industry got to where they are today 
and what a day in the life looks like.

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Career Path: Heidi Schmidt, Data Engineer at PatientPing banner image

Career Path: Heidi Schmidt, Data Engineer at PatientPing

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What do the career path and day-in-the-life look like for a Data Engineer at PatientPing?

We connected with Heidi Schmidt to find out!

Interested in working at PatientPing? Check out all of the company's job openings on the sidebar!


Where did you grow up?  What did your parents do for work?  

I was born in Columbus Ohio and most of my childhood was spent in Columbus and Dayton Ohio. My Mom worked in the Hotel Industry then in Hospice care. 

My Dad worked as a Mechanical Engineer for Kroger Bakery for most of his career. 

Where did you go to college?  What did you study and what were some of your initial jobs out of school?

I went to college at Ohio State University and took 4 classes my 1st semester. One of them was architectural history and from that I wanted to study Architecture. 

I had 3 jobs in college. One working informally for the Architecture Computer lab, The Smith Physics lab, and the MAGNUS computer group. 

Outside of school I was a paper delivery person from 10 years of age to my summer before college. 

I volunteered at the Center Of Science and Industry (COSI) all through high school. 

I worked remodelling houses and doing jobs for my Dad and step mom as well. 

What has attributed to your success thus far and has helped propel you to the position you have now?

A willingness to be an uncarved block. A desire to learn new things and make the world a better place. 
 

Any tips for someone considering a career in Engineering? 

Technology has changed so much so that we have tons of options. So many that it’s hard to reduce the noise to signal. My advice would be to get out and meet as many different people and see how you can help. 


Day in the Life

Coffee, tea, or nothing?

Tea in a large oversized mug

What time do you get into the office?

Typically 9AM -- though the MBTA can make it a challenge

What are three things that motivate you in your role?

The desire to make the world a bit better than I found it. Solving a puzzle. Collaboration. 

What time do you head out of the office?

I head out of the office around 4:30 p.m. because the MBTA is so variable. I end up checking things outside of the office and also do work when needed off hours. 

Do you log back in at night or do you shut it down completely?

Depends on what is needed.  I check my phone on the train as I try to stay focused during the day. Most of the time I shut down being available from about 9PM to the next day.  I check in the a.m. before I get into the office to be prepared for anything that may have occurred (mostly on the train) 

Any productivity hacks?

TextExpander rocks my world. It saves my brain a bunch of typing and can run quick shortcuts and commands that I use frequently. 

What are the 3 apps that you can’t live without?

  • Headspace

  • DataCamp

  • Sudoku 

What professional accomplishment are you proudest of?

At Gillette I reached out to the factory floor team to ask what their pain points were with their databases I supported. Their Boston database was not keeping up with reporting. After sorting out scope, the vendor, the types of needs for the software and the database options I was able to template the solution for 3 of the 5 factories, increase the speed, space, type, and throughput of the bare metal hardware, upgrade and tune the Oracle Database for one particular use case pattern, and provide them their reports in 8-10 minute that had been left to run for weeks on a dedicated work station on the factory floor.  Through my work the executive team was able to fix the original contract, obtain updated software, and get the deliverables promised by the vendor years ago when the system was first implemented.

About the
Company

Bamboo Health is a hyper-growth, cloud-based, mission-driven healthcare technology organization, transforming patient care through care collaboration.

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How to Land a Career in Product Management - Top Boston Product Talent Share Their Tips banner image

How to Land a Career in Product Management - Top Boston Product Talent Share Their Tips

Career Path is a regular series on VentureFizz where we connect with individuals from our BIZZpages, which are the fastest-growing tech companies in the Boston tech scene. We learn a lot about each person's background and what a day in the life is like for them.

We have compiled advice from some of the Product Managers that have been profiled. They share the details on how job seekers can obtain a career in the field of Product Management. 


"Seize any opportunity you can to take on product management-like responsibilities at your current company, even if there is no formal product management team structure. Express your interest, and take on small tech projects to get your feet wet in working through an initiative from inception, to design, through build, to launch. And if you don’t have a technical background, don’t let that intimidate you. You’ll get used to taking on something that seems insurmountable to understand, and by the end of it, knowing very well what the inner workings are and how to explain them to others. I still face this from time to time and always tell myself that, as long as I keep asking questions, it’s only a matter of time until I understand and can speak intelligently about it."

Read Shana's Career Path here.

Click here for jobs at PlacePass.


"Reach out to people currently working in product. Ask to get coffee. Go to meetups and read as much as you can about the role. If you come from a technical background, that’s awesome, If not, don’t be intimidated or count yourself out of a career that really interests you. Figure out what draws you to product. Once you know, repeat that back to yourself and get good at telling that story to other people. If you come from a place of authenticity and genuine interest, people will respond well to that and want to help you as you jump into a new path."

Read Christine's Career Path here.

Click here for jobs at SessionM.


"My biggest tip to someone considering a career in product management is to embrace their background. There is no traditional product manager; the team is made up of people with a wide variety of experiences (professional and personal). I would also advise people to stay current and curious – inspiration can come from anywhere."

Read Chris' Career Path here.

Click here for jobs at BCG.


Nick Leonard

"Discover your personal spike? Are you the connective tissue that breaks down organizational silos? Are you the brilliant empathizer that has an uncanny knack for understanding users? Are you the engineer’s best friends with your perfect articulation of features and needs? There are lots of things a Product Manager has to do. Understand your strengths and play to them. Where you are weak, you get to choose: Either improve them or build a team that mitigates your weaknesses."

Read Nick's Career Path here.

Click here for jobs at Jobcase.


Maggie Brenner

"Talk to anyone you can who’s an engineer, product manager or designer. Learn about the variations between companies and which type of role you think will be best for you. I also went to a few meetups and introductory courses which gave me some solid baseline knowledge. There’s a ton of great literature out there about the PM role, product teams and how to work best with engineers which I would recommend reading. I found Cracking the PM Interview helpful in understanding what the interview process might look like. Think about what your best entry point is. For me, it has been beneficial to move internally. While I’m learning the role, I’m able to leverage strong knowledge of our product and customers."

Read Maggie's Career Path here.

Click here for jobs at Ellevation.


Colin Barry is the Content Manager for VentureFizz. Follow him on Twitter @ColinKrash

Career Path: Polina Atamyeyeva, Lead QA Engineer at Jackpocket banner image

Career Path: Polina Atamyeyeva, Lead QA Engineer at Jackpocket

Open Jobs Company Page

What do the career path and the day-in-the-life look like for a Lead QA Engineer at Jackpocket?

We connected with Polina Atamyeyeva to find out!

Click here for a list of job openings at Jackpocket, or check out the right side of this page!


Where did you grow up?  What did your parents do for work?  

Luhansk, Ukraine. Later, I won a Green Card lottery and decided to see what the future held for me in New York.

In Ukraine, my mother was a pediatrician and my father was a mechanical engineer. They recently immigrated to the USA, and they’re in the process of finding their path in this country. I respect them for being independent of me; it’s not an easy task to do in a foreign country at their age. 

Where did you go to college?  What did you study and what were some of your initial jobs out of school?

When I finished high school, I moved to Kharkov to get a degree in sociology.  I always loved big cities, which is why I moved from the small Luhansk to the significantly bigger Kharkov. While I was in college I worked with a marketing company. We conducted marketing research, doing all kinds of surveys and focus groups. Companies made advertisements for their products based on the research. I enjoyed every minute of my work.

When I moved to New York I decided to get a Bachelor of Arts from Hunter College CUNY, with a major in sociology and a minor in statistics, to increase my chances of getting a similar job here. While establishing myself in sociology, a friend of mine suggested quality assurance (QA), since it is an easier field to get into without having a master’s degree. 

At that time, I thought it was a crazy idea since I didn’t have a technical background. Since I am very adventurous, I tried it anyway. I am glad I did because I like what I do now. 

What has attributed to your success thus far and has helped propel you to the position you have now?

A few things:

  • The most important—my kids. I wanted them to be proud of their mom. I wanted to show them that with enough perseverance and optimistic attitude, you can do anything. 

  • My friends played an essential role too. They helped me to believe in myself and showed me how to not give up. 

  • I always have been lucky with my team. In all the places I’ve worked, colleagues have helped me to learn something new and grow. 

Can you share the high-level responsibilities of your current position as Lead QA Engineer at Jackpocket?

I am responsible for overseeing and making sure the Jackpocket apps and website work as expected, so that customer service has as little work as possible. The fewer issues that get into production, the fewer questions that need answering. And this includes making sure new features are usable and clear to end-users.

A big part of illuminating issues in production is established the right processes and communication between different teams. I like to think about QA as an art of collecting business requirements. During the process of building features, requirements get changed all the time. It is important to make sure to flag disconnect in early stages, and to bring everybody to the same page if something changes. 

Also, I know it may not seem this way but QAs are trying to save time for engineers. I am always researching what tools to use and what we can do to provide better coverage.     

Any tips for someone considering a career in engineering?

If I can do it with my degree in humanities, you can do it, too, if you like learning.

You will always need to learn something new since technologies are changing so quickly. But that’s what makes this field so interesting and dynamic. Also, if you encounter a problem, chances are that somebody else already has a solution. You are not alone. Just Google it. 

Polina Atamyeyeva


Day in the Life

  • Coffee, tea, or nothing? Coffee in the morning and tea during the rest of the day

  • What time do you get into the office? 9 - 9:30 am

  • What are three things that motivate you in your role?

    • It is always interesting to work on innovative features. I like seeing when a new feature is shaping up from nothing.

    • Customer feedback is also very motivational. It is very satisfying to see that somebody likes your efforts.

    • Challenges, when you need to figure something out. I get more energetic when I figure out some difficult tasks. 

  • Every day is different, but can you outline what a typical day looks like for you?

    • Usually, I start by reading emails and Slack notifications. It sets my priorities for the day. Later, we have a scrum meeting where everyone briefs the team about their work progress and challenges. After that, I get to my daily tasks, which usually involves asking a lot of questions. Everyone usually gets some: designers, product, marketing, not to mention engineers. I really appreciate everybody’s cooperation and patience. I am so lucky that everybody works as a team and contributes to the success of the projects.  

  • What time do you head out of the office? 

    • If there are no urgent issues I leave at 5 - 5:30 pm

  • Do you log back in at night or do you shut it down completely?  

    • I shut it down with very few exceptions. I appreciate that I can do all my work in the office. The schedule at Jackpocket is flexible enough to accommodate different people's needs. 

  • Any productivity hacks?

    • Get enough sleep. That is why I believe people should shut down Slack and work email at night or during vacation.

    • Be proud of your work. You need to be passionate about it. Make it interesting and challenging enough to keep you going, if it is not.

    • Sometimes you need to take a step back from what you are doing to find the best solution.

    • Always break big tasks into smaller, more manageable pieces.

  • What are the 3 apps that you can’t live without?

    • Jackpocket :) I open it every day. We’re on both iOS and Android

    • Angry Birds Blast. This game helps me to not be annoyed with New York public transportation and regroup after reading news in the morning. 

    • Splitwise. I do not use it every day, but it makes it so much more convenient to track expenses when you organize trips/events with your friends or relatives.

  • What do you love about Jackpocket?

    • We have very friendly and unpretentious people. Management puts a lot of effort into making sure people enjoy working here, and it’s very noticeable. We do a lot of fun activities like happy hours, trips to Six Flags, a field day with Zog Sports, and more. And the office is a reflection of who we are, right down to the “Jackpocket blue” of our phone booths.

  • What professional accomplishment are you proudest of?

    • I am usually very proud of releasing features that were difficult to develop. That said, I always think that my biggest accomplishments are in my future. 

  • Who do you admire or call upon for professional advice?

    • It depends on the professional advice I need. I reach out to different people. My husband is probably my most trusted advisor at the moment.   

    • I have a deep respect for people who are passionate about what they do. They usually know a lot of information and think outside of the box. 


Alexander Culafi is Producer & Editor for VentureFizz. He also edits and produces The VentureFizz Podcast. You can follow him on Twitter @culafia.

About the
Company

Jackpocket is the first mobile lottery app in the U.S. that offers players a secure way to order official state lottery tickets, such as Powerball, Mega Millions, and more, via their smartphones.

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Career Path: Margaret Leoffler, Marketing Manager at TriNetX banner image

Career Path: Margaret Leoffler, Marketing Manager at TriNetX

Open Jobs Company Page

What do the career path and day-in-the-life look like for a Marketing Manager at TriNetX? 

We connected with Margaret Leoffler to find out!

Also, TriNetX is hiring. Check out all of the company’s job openings on the list to the right.


Margaret Leoffler
Margaret Leoffler, Marketing Manager at TriNetX

Where did you grow up?  What did your parents do for work?  

I grew up in Brattleboro, Vermont and I moved to Stoughton, MA when I was 14. My mom is an accountant and my dad was a tire salesman.

Where did you go to college?  What did you study and what were some of your initial jobs out of school?

I went to Drexel University. I studied English but wanted work experience, which is why I chose Drexel, which is a Co-Op school. My first two co-ops were in education, and my third was in a corporate communications department for Comcast. It was there where I realized I prefer working in a corporate environment. I interned there for another eighteen months, and went on to work in marketing & business development at a few different companies in Philadelphia.

What has attributed to your success thus far and has helped propel you to the position you have now?

I make it a point to be explicit and goals-driven with my managers when it comes to my professional development. I also am the type to look at my colleagues as collaborators, not competition. I really enjoy coordinating projects across departments and try to make sure I have a good working relationships with the different departments. I really do think that success can be had when you position long-term projects as something we’re all working on together.

Can you share the high-level responsibilities of your current position as Marketing Manager at TrinetX?

Much of my work is based on lead generation. I currently manage our webinar series which occurs quarterly. I also project manage the creation of our marketing materials, ensuring that our many collaborators contribute and sign off by the deadline. I also coordinate programming for many our events. There are many one-off projects and requests coming in from the company all the time.

Any tips for someone considering a career in Marketing?

Do your research; see what other similar companies are doing so you can stay up-to-date on the latest marketing trends.


Day in the Life

Coffee, tea, or nothing?

Coffee! We have cold brew taps in our office and I definitely take advantage of that perk daily.

What time do you get into the office? 

Between 8:30 and 9 AM.

What are three things that motivate you in your role?

My company is a very welcoming place to work. I really like my coworkers; being a woman at a tech company can sometimes be a challenge, but TriNetX has a great group of supportive women working here, many in visible leadership positions, which makes a huge difference. I attached a photo of a gift given to the women of our office on International Women’s Day, which included a book of inspirational quotes from women throughout history, and some cute custom cookies.

What time do you head out of the office? 

Usually 5 PM.

Do you log back in at night or do you shut it down completely?  

It depends; if we have a deliverable or event within the week I will, and I’ll check email in the evenings after dinner.

Any productivity hacks?

Keep a checklist of items you need to do, however small they may be. I keep mine in a file on my desktop, and I’ll often add pictures and use funky font colors to keep it cheerful.

What are the 3 apps that you can’t live without?

Twitter, Spotify, and Slack.

Who do you admire or call upon for professional advice?

 My mom!


Colin Barry is the Content Manager for VentureFizz. Follow him on Twitter @ColinKrash

Images courtesy of Margaret Leoffler

About the
Company

The Global Health Research Network for Healthcare Organizations, BioPharma & CROs.

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Career Path: Kevin Elliot, VP, Inside Sales at BlueConic banner image

Career Path: Kevin Elliot, VP, Inside Sales at BlueConic

Open Jobs Company Page

What do the career path and day-in-the-life look like for the VP, Inside Sales at BlueConic?

We connected with Kevin Elliot to find out!

Interested in working at BlueConic? Check out all of the company’s job openings on the list to the right.


Where did you grow up?  What did your parents do for work?  

I grew up south of Boston in Scituate, Massachusetts. My father spent the majority of his career in tech and about 15 years as the CEO of a few software organizations. My mother started and ran a pre-school in Scituate for about 20 years.

Where did you go to college?  What did you study and what were some of your initial jobs out of school?

UMass Amherst. I studied managerial economics and finance. My first job out of UMass was as a Fund Accountant at State Street. They acquired Investors Bank & Trust in 2007 and I worked on the conversion team moving them over to State Street accounting systems. Looking back at those days there were a lot of long hours, problem-solving and implementing new processes. I kid around about it today, but other than the 40,000 employees. It was a lot like working at a growth stage software company!

What has attributed to your success thus far and has helped propel you to the position you have now?

There are a number of things at different points in time; however, the one constant has been the people that I’ve been fortunate enough to work with. They challenge me to be better every day, but you can learn a lot from your colleagues if you pay close attention and have an open mind.

Can you share the high-level responsibilities of your current position as VP, Inside Sales at BlueConic?

  • Helping marketers realize that individualized marketing is a reality and helping them put plans in place to help them achieve a unified and actionable single view of their customer.
     
  • Coaching, hiring, and retaining exceptional members of our Business Development, Sales, and Sales Engineering teams.
     
  • Collaborating across departments to create and implement strategies for both inbound and outbound pipeline generation.
     
  • Analyze historical data and trends to build models for scaling our sales organization as efficiently as possible.

Any tips for someone considering a career in Sales?

Be incredibly curious and always focus on how you can improve. Regardless of how great the training program is at your current company, always look outside of your company to learn as well. I’d say the same to someone who has been in sales for 10+ years. New ideas and new approaches create good habits and prevent laziness or bad habits from forming.

Jim Collins speaks about “the window and the mirror” in his book Good to Great. The concept is perfect for people starting out in sales. If things are going well, look through the window and give everyone around you credit. If things aren’t going well, look in the mirror, take ownership of finding how to fix things. Far too often sales reps do the exact opposite.  


Day in the Life

Coffee, tea, or nothing?

Coffee, one in the morning and another around 2:30 PM every day.

What time do you get into the office?

Usually between 7:30 and 8 AM.

What are three things that motivate you in your role?

  1. The people I work with. Their passion and work ethic are absolutely relentless.

  2. Knowing that we’re doing something different. No one has built this company, in this category, with these people. There are new challenges and new achievements every single day.

  3. The opportunity to help define the Customer Data Platform (CDP) category and helping change the way marketers think about individualized marketing.

Every day is different, but can you outline what a typical day looks like for you?

  • Before Work: I like to work out in the morning before commuting. During the commute, I run through my calendar to make sure I’m prepped for the day and then will run through the pipeline to make sure we have plans in place each day to move things forward.

  • Morning: Before 9 AM, I’m doing deeper analysis and tasks that require more focus. I try to most of my coaching in the morning so we can focus on statistics and I can focus on my team before too many distractions come up.

  • Lunch: I’m a creature of habit, most of my lunches are spent working at my desk and 9 times out of 10 it’s a salad from UDG or sweetgreen.

  • Afternoon: I’m almost always on sales calls with my team or collaborating with other departments in internal initiatives.

  • After Work: While commuting home I’m making sure any materials or information that I’ll need for the following day are prepped and ready or I’m making sure all of my action items for the day are taken care of.

What time do you head out of the office?

It really depends on what is in my calendar but usually between 5:30-6:30 PM.

Do you log back in at night or do you shut it down completely?  

I try really hard not to log back in every night, but sometimes it can’t be avoided. I probably log back on 50% of the time. I’m always available if one of my colleagues needs me via Slack or email.

Any productivity hacks?

  • Figure out what the best way is to organize your to-do list and commit to it. Some use tools like Trello and some use a notebook. Figure out what works for you. I’ve tried a number of apps, but always come back to my pen and pad.

  • Try to organize your day by when you focus best. I tend to be more analytical in the mornings and more creative in the afternoons. In knowing that I try my best to organize my tasks to optimize my day.

  • Music! Create a playlist that you listen to when you need to really concentrate and only listen to it while you’re focusing.

What are the 3 apps that you can’t live without?

  • Slack

  • Spotify

  • Food/Coffee Loyalty Apps: Starbucks, Dunkin’, sweetgreen

What professional accomplishment are you proudest of?

Watching people that I’ve coached and trained get promoted and excel in their new role is incredibly rewarding. I think my most proud accomplishment is still being developed. We’re writing an amazing story here at BlueConic. That story won’t be my individual accomplishment, but I’m extremely proud to be an element of what we’re building.

Who do you admire or call upon for professional advice?

There’s a long list of people that I have admiration for and who have helped me in various situations. A number of my good friends hold similar roles at relatable companies and often act as a sounding board. My father loves to share stories from his career and tie them back to what I’m working on. Lastly, my colleagues and team members at BlueConic have been an incredible resource.


Colin Barry is the Content Manager on VentureFizz. Follow him on Twitter @ColinKrash

Images courtesy of Kevin Elliot

About the
Company

The world’s leading customer data platform, liberates companies’ first-party data by giving business users access to unified and actionable customer data that offers both confidence and utility whenever and wherever they need it.

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Career Path: Nolan Kelly, Director of National Hospital Growth at PatientPing banner image

Career Path: Nolan Kelly, Director of National Hospital Growth at PatientPing

Open Jobs Company Page

What do the career path and day-in-the-life look like for a Director of National Hospital Growth at PatientPing?

We connected with Nolan Kelly to find out!

Also, PatientPing is hiring! Click here for all of the company’s job openings!


Where did you go to college?  What did you study and what were some of your initial jobs out of school?  

Boston College, Carroll School of Management with a Marketing concentration.  My initial job out of undergrad was at a consumer marketing agency in Boston. I was fortunate to align myself with one of the SVPs who was starting a healthcare practice within the agency.  Both my parents and my older brother are clinicians, so there was this innate interest in joining this emerging healthcare marketing group. I quickly got plugged into client assignments across health systems, pharma, payer, policy work, and medical devices.  I’d say that diversity of work was the catalyst for my desire to learn more about how these disparate areas all worked together to deliver positive patient experiences.

What has attributed to your success thus far and has helped propel you to the position you have now?  

In the first few years of my career, I had the opportunity to work for incredibly smart, committed, and hands-on leaders. I was young and impressionable, and they were willing to help me learn, bring me into many c-suite and senior executive meetings and strategic planning initiatives.  It forced me to mature professionally very quickly, exposed me to higher-level thinking, and definitely shaped how I approach business. It also had a lasting impression on my management style.

Can you share the high-level responsibilities of your current position as Director of National Hospital Growth at PatientPing?  

At its most basic level, I am responsible for building and managing the team that sells PatientPing’s solution to hospitals and health systems across the country.  We have growth goals to hit and I need to make sure the team is organized, aligned, and ready to achieve the goals. More broadly, I have the responsibility of helping inform our cross-functional teams about market trends, customer needs, product opportunities, where we should prioritize/invest, and more.  

Any tips for someone considering a career in sales for a high-growth organization?  

Step outside the concept of a comfort zone - you can’t have one if you want to be successful in sales for a high-growth organization.  Ask questions and be studious. Absorb as much as you can. Be flexible, courteous, respectful, and live up to your word. Every customer is different, every opportunity is different, and it’s your job to assess those dynamics quickly, pivot where needed, take punches, and solve problems.  Always take full accountability. On our Growth team, everyone has a specific job to do. If you can’t get it done, no one is there to do it for you. Lastly, find your own motivations and stay true to them. Success is binary - you either got it done or you didn’t - so you need to find wins and celebrate them along the way, it’s the only way to keep energy and optimism while moving forward.


Day in the Life

Coffee, tea, or nothing?

Coffee, splash of milk. I generally stick to 1 cup a day.

What are three things that motivate you in your role?

  1. Building the team that’s going to win deals and build our customer network.  

  2. Helping the team win deals and build our customer network.

  3. Feeling the incremental progress each day that is contributing a much bigger mission.

Every day is different, but can you outline what a typical day looks like for you?

  • I have 3 little boys, so everyday starts by 6 AM with someone jumping on me in bed.

  • Once I’m awake, I’m on email and slack. I’m not really proud of that, it’s a bad habit. I prob do 10-15 min of work before getting out of bed.

  • When I can, I try to sneak in a few miles on the treadmill.

  • I live south of Boston, so I take the Commuter Boat up from Hingham. It’s some of the most productive time of my day.

  • Once in the office, it’s a race, my calendar is filled with meetings that support the growth of our team and business. I consider my commute time my “blocked” time where I get an hour at the beginning of the day and an hour later in the day to catch up on any open items.  

  • I try to sneak out of the office early so I can get home for dinner with my wife and kids.  This is one of the only non-negotiables for me. I’m going to get home to spend some time with my family and, at the very least, be a part of dinner and bedtime.  

  • Read books to kids and get them in bed

  • Hang with my wife - catch up - might be over a show, a drink, or a sports game on TV.  

  • Emails and unfinished work before calling it a day.

Any productivity hacks?

There are no hacks to hard work.

What are the two apps that you can’t live without?

  1. LinkedIn

  2. Spotify

What professional accomplishment are you proudest of?

I’m most proud of what we’re building at PatientPing. This is no small feat - engaging and connecting the largest and most respected health systems and the community of providers who help them care for shared patients. What we are doing is transforming healthcare and I’m so proud of that endeavor.


Colin Barry is the Content Manager on VentureFizz. Follow him on Twitter @ColinKrash

Images courtesy of Nolan Kelly

About the
Company

Bamboo Health is a hyper-growth, cloud-based, mission-driven healthcare technology organization, transforming patient care through care collaboration.

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Career Path: Andrew Magne, Solutions Architect at Ordergroove banner image

Career Path: Andrew Magne, Solutions Architect at Ordergroove

Open Jobs Company Page

What do the career path and the day-in-the-life look like for a Solutions Architect at Ordergroove

We connected with Andrew Magne to find out!

Click here for a list of job openings at Ordergroove!


Where did you grow up?  What did your parents do for work?  

The great state of Minnesota (winless in major sports championships since 1991). My dad worked in asset management and my mom runs a small company that produces custom apparel.

Where did you go to college?  What did you study there and what was your first job out of school?

I went to school at the University of Southern California and studied economics. My first job was at a sports marketing firm in their analytics/measurement division where we helped brands understand the return on their sponsorship spend.

How did you get into the tech industry and what brought you to Ordergroove?

I liked my job but was ready to move to a smaller company where I could have a larger impact. Ordergroove was included on a list of fast-growing startups in the NYC area so I figured I’d throw my hat in the ring. I didn’t have much in the way of tech experience beyond a few CS classes I had taken for fun in college, but I’m sure glad Ordergroove took a chance on hiring me.

What are the details in terms of your role and responsibilities as a Solutions Architect?

Ordergroove is creating a new category of commerce and my responsibility is to help support the technical side of our sales cycles as we bring new brands and retailers onboard. Our team strives to ensure our platform is a good technical fit for the prospective client as well as educate them on the features and functionality that will drive their success.

You’ve been promoted a couple of times since joining Ordergroove. What advice would you give to others who are looking for a rapid ascent in terms of their career path?

My advice would be to keep an open mind and be opportunistic when you see a match between a business need and your career interests. If you try to define a rigid career path too far in advance you may leave yourself blind to a role that would have been a great fit (this is as true for the company as it is for the employee).

Andrew Magne Ordergroove


Day in the Life

Coffee, tea, or nothing?

Cold brew on tap, please.

Every day is different, but can you outline what a typical day looks like for you?

If I’m on the road I’ll try to knock out as much work as possible prior to the day’s agenda, meet with the brand or retailer(s) on site, and cross my fingers for good WiFi on the flight back to New York. If I’m in the office, I’m usually meeting with cross-functional teams to determine the best technical approach to serve the needs of our current and prospective clients.

Any productivity hacks?

One good tip is to respond to each email or Slack immediately (< 2 minutes) or save it for a thoughtful response later. Don’t get stuck wasting 10 minutes deciding whether to respond.

What professional accomplishment are you proudest of?

First ever employee in my role at Ordergroove.

Who do you admire or call upon for professional advice?

Beyond my teammates at Ordergroove, I’d probably have to say my mom.


Alexander Culafi is Producer & Editor for VentureFizz. He also edits and produces The VentureFizz Podcast. You can follow him on Twitter @culafia.

About the
Company

Relationships are the heart of commerce. Let's build them together.

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Career Path: Matt Young, VP of Cloud Operations at EverQuote banner image

Career Path: Matt Young, VP of Cloud Operations at EverQuote

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What do the career path and the day-in-a-life look like for the VP of Cloud Operations at EverQuote?

We connected with Matt Young to find out!

Also, EverQuote is hiring! Click here for all of the company’s job openings.


Where did you grow up?  What did your parents do for work?  

New Jersey is the first place I remember. In 4th grade we moved to Dryden, a very small town outside Ithaca, NY.  From grades 4-8 I went to a small church school in a renovated barn. There were seven kids in my 8th grade class. I attended a public high school, with 133 kids in my graduating class in 1994, then left behind cows, corn, and countryside and headed to college.

My father was an inspector for animal food mills and later a Feed Microscopist - “QA zoomed in.”  My mother is a first generation American who grew up working my grandparent’s flower farm in NJ. She continued the family business as a florist and caterer with my Aunt. I grew up prepping massive quantities of food and flowers for weddings and parties.  

In the first half of college, I frequently went home for the holidays to work with food+flowers to fund food+school.

Where did you go to college?  What did you study?

I attended Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), starting as a physics major. After a semester I switched to Chemistry. Two-and-a-half years into my undergrad I felt that while Chemistry is fascinating it wasn’t my passion. I was staying up WAY too late at night playing with the unix servers on campus. Rendering raytraced images took DAYS on my i386 and a few hours when the servers were idle at night.

I pushed my own reset button, changed my major to Computer Science, and took a full year off.  I joined an enterprise storage management startup (HighGround Systems) writing test automation code. When I returned to school I transitioned to an engineering role and worked 20-40 hrs/week while finishing my degree. I found that the job as an engineer lent perspective and context to what I was studying...and food.

As part of my time at WPI I did 2 projects with companies. The first was in London developing a marketing and business plan for a research group’s Internet rollout (1998). The second was with an industrial automation company (Intellution, 1999) where we designed and implemented a “Distributed Object Brokerage” - connecting management software to robot controllers via C++, DCOM, and graph theory.

Matt Young

What was your path from 2000 to EverQuote?

After graduating I moved to Seattle to join Microsoft. I spent six years on a hard real-time OS team (Windows CE): two years working on a kernel debugger, a profiler, and compilers, and another four in a “boots on the ground” engineering role. The latter was formative for me.

If we were engaged, a partner’s project was behind/failing or was using a new OS feature. My job was a mixture of debugging, diagnostics, training, and acting as an engineering conduit between our engineering teams creating the OS and hardware companies wanting to use it. I was able to work on video streaming devices, VoIP, routers, and some of the first “personal digital assistants” - precursors to smartphones. I got to learn ARM & MIPS and work at all layers of the stack from hardware to UI.

I found that I loved giving talks and working across teams/companies in a technical capacity. I discovered that I loved jumping on planes and not knowing the local language. I enjoyed debugging thorny issues with others more than creating new ones. I still do.

I moved to Germany and spent a couple years working with a Research team on embedded hypervisors and P2P networking research. I then returned to the US in customer facing support and engineering roles for MS’s application virtualization products. Again I gravitated to deeply technical and customer facing teams and tasks. After nearly a dozen years with Microsoft life events motivated a change.

I spent the next 7 years with Dell, VMware, and Red Hat. Virtualization, IaaS, orchestration systems and dev tooling formed a common thread throughout. I had a chance to learn and work with NetBSD, Linux, Windows, OpenStack, and Azure in a variety of languages. Throughout I found myself drawn to collaborative opportunities vs. individual contributor roles.

What has contributed to your success thus far and has helped propel you to the position you have now?

Being enthusiastic about bridging traditional roles and intentionally seeking out opportunities in multidisciplinary settings is perhaps a factor. Nearly every job where I’ve been successful has been a blend of Dev/QA/PM/Support. When an organization’s culture rewards solving problems irrespective of “role,” I have been the most engaged. It’s one of the many reasons I’m so excited to be a part of EverQuote.

Can you share the high-level responsibilities of your current position as VP of Cloud Operations at Everquote?

Our team combines aspects of Site Reliability Engineering, Service Design Consultancy, and Operations. We...

  • Ensure that our infrastructure continues to enable our growth and business objectives.

  • Create, curate, and champion patterns and best practices for cloud native designs.

  • Partner with our engineering teams to produce solutions that are scalable, observable, and sustainable.

  • Provide development tools, systems, and methodologies that allow our engineering teams to manage their own services in production.

  • Manage our infrastructure, responding to operational issues that impact our workloads.

  • Manage our relationships and costs with cloud providers and vendors.

My role at EverQuote is to build, grow, and sustain a team that achieves these goals in an open, transparent, and inclusive way.

We’re hiring. Join us!

Any tips for someone considering a career in Engineering?

  • Be Kind. Listen first. Assume good intentions.

  • Be open to new ideas.

  • Make sure that you are solving the right problem(s).

  • Articulate and communicate your ideas. Ask for feedback.

  • Draw diagrams and pictures.  Often.

  • Be curious.


Day in the Life

Coffee, tea, or nothing?

Coffee (hot or cold).  Aspirational goal: more water, less caffeine.

What time do you get into the office? When do you leave?

I arrive between 8:00 - 10:00, and leave 4:00 - 8:00. I’m a single dad with what appears to be an irregular weekly schedule. It’s a very regular 14-day schedule.

What are three things that motivate you in your role?

  1. Facilitating the professional growth of others.

  2. The sheer geekly awesomeness of modern infrastructure design. We are at a point where ideas that have been “the future” for decades are finally possible.  Lately for me this is k8s, istio, opencensus, go, spark, and a pile of other fun stuff.

  3. The opportunity to provide tools & techniques that improve our developers’ experience and velocity.

Every day is different, but can you outline what a typical day looks like for you?

  • Standup

  • n * {1:1, planning, reading, writing, listening, learning, sharing, doing}

Do you log back in at night or do you shut it down completely?  

I usually log back in and sometimes stay up objectively up way too late - particularly if I’m doing dev stuff or learning new things. Finding balance isn’t something I’ve yet achieved.  I have been making inroads. There’s life going on out there!

Any productivity hacks?

  • Sleep.

  • Don’t boil the ocean when you need enough hot water to make tea.

  • Done > perfect.  Iterate.

What are 3 apps that you can’t live without?

  • EverDrive!

  • Youtube (CNCF, MS, Google, KubeCon, k8s, tech talks, …)

  • MyWeather (“shall I motorcycle now?”)

Matt Young


Colin Barry is the Content Manager on VentureFizz. Follow him on Twitter @ColinKrash

Images courtesy of Matt Young

 

About the
Company

We are the largest online Auto Insurance marketplace in the U.S. We're helping end distracted driving with our safe driving app, EverDrive.

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Career Path: Amelia Hagen, Program Manager in R&D Engineering at Starry banner image

Career Path: Amelia Hagen, Program Manager in R&D Engineering at Starry

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What do the career path and the day-in-a-life look like for a Program Manager in R&D Engineering at Starry?

We connected with Amelia Hagen to find out!

Also, Starry is hiring! Click here to see all of the company’s openings!


Where did you grow up?  What was your favorite childhood memory?  

I grew up in a small rural town in New Hampshire called Contoocook. It was always easy to spot out-of-towners by the way they mispronounced the town name. Growing up surrounded by woods, rivers, and animals provided endless entertainment as a kid. My favorite childhood memory was when my brother decided that he wanted to be a chicken farmer, so my parents thought he should start learning the ropes right away (he did not choose this career path, ultimately). Despite the early morning hours feeding the chickens, and the hours spent cleaning the coop, we were always so excited to gather fresh eggs.  

What did you study in college and what were some of your initial jobs out of school?

I studied Technical Writing in college and graduated in 2009 - just after the recession started in 2008. Since jobs for new grads were hard to come by (and more so for new grads still trying to decide what to do for a living), I joined AmeriCorps Victim Assistance Program in New Hampshire. For about 2 years I volunteered full-time as an advocate for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault at the Manchester Police Department while working a retail job in the evenings & weekends to make ends meet. I eventually migrated to Massachusetts and fell into formal Project Management after working for a small marketing company in Rhode Island.

What has attributed to your success thus far and has helped propel you to the position you have now?

I’ve had a couple of really great managers in the past who taught me the basics and helped me understand the breadth and direction Project Management can take. Prior to their influence, I wasn’t willing to settle for a position or a place of employment that couldn’t meet my expectations for my long-term career goals. Professional improvement and learning have always been very important to me.

Can you share the high-level responsibilities of your current position as a Program Manager at Starry?

I manage programs in Starry’s R&D Engineering group. This ranges from daily project communication, to process improvements, and encompasses working with teams around traditional project constraints such as schedule, risks, availability, quality, and - it wouldn’t be fun without this - project changes based on business or market needs.

Any tips for someone considering a career in Project Management?

A lot of pre-existing experience can be marketed as Project Management - start with that marketing before seeking out certifications or more degrees. Real-world experience in project management is very valuable.


Day in the Life
 

Coffee, Tea?

One cup of scalding black coffee as soon as I wake up, another two cups at work in the morning, and a fourth after lunch.

What time do you get into the office?

Between 8:30 & 9.

What are three things that motivate you in your role?

  1. I am always learning something new

  2. I work with very smart, driven people

  3. Did I mention I am always learning something new?

Every day is different, but can you outline what a typical day looks like for you?

Meetings, brainstorm sessions, hallway conversations, slack messages, and when it’s 4:30/5pm, I get to start my day.

What time do you head out of the office?

Around 6ish, but sometimes  I stay later to finish up what I am working on.

Do you log back in at night or do you shut it down completely?  

Depending on the week (and whether I’m running out of time for my weekly goals), I’ll log back in. When I do, often it’s after I hit the gym and I’ll work in front of the tube. I try to keep my weekends open, so I don’t mind working late during the week.

Any productivity hacks?

I write a small list of weekly goals every Monday morning and decide if they’re must do, could do, or a stretch goal for the week.

What professional accomplishment are you proudest of?

I earned my PMP a little over a year ago and was proud that I passed the test the first time I took it. But I’m mostly proud I get to work at Starry, and being a part of team growth & development.

Who do you admire or call upon for professional advice?

I call my brother to bounce ideas off of him since we have somewhat similar jobs. Sometimes, he throws in some free chicken-farming advice.


Colin Barry is the Content Manager on VentureFizz. Follow him on Twitter @ColinKrash

Images courtesy of Amelia Hagen

About the
Company

Starry is making Internet better for everyone, from easy-to-use Wi-Fi products to radical Internet service. Happy Interneting.

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Career Path: Neil Forbes, Vice President of Enterprise Sales at Quick Base banner image

Career Path: Neil Forbes, Vice President of Enterprise Sales at Quick Base

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What do the career path and the day-in-a-life look like for the Vice President of Enterprise Sales at Quick Base?

We connected with Neil Forbes to find out!

Also, Quick Base is hiring! Click here to see all of the company’s openings!


Where did you grow up?  What did your parents do for work?  

I grew up in North Kingstown, RI. My father was a middle school history teacher and later a high school guidance counselor. My mother was a middle school home economics teacher and later a high school art teacher.

Where did you go to college?  What did you study and what were some of your initial jobs out of school?

I majored in Art, Philosophy & Literature with a minor in Systems Engineering at the United States Military Academy at West Point. I later studied Film Directing and Production in UCLA’s Graduate Film Program. My first jobs after West Point were as a rifle platoon leader and mortar platoon leader with the 101st Airborne Division in Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom I. While I was in grad school I did everything from assistant editing gigs for reality television shows to teaching film to working as a bouncer at night clubs and hotels.

What has attributed to your success thus far and has helped propel you to the position you have now?

The leadership training I received at West Point, in Ranger School and through leading platoons in combat was second to none and greatly contributed to my success so far.

Can you share the high-level responsibilities of your current position as Vice President of Enterprise Sales at Quick Base?

  • Collaborate with customer base to align our platform with their business needs

  • Identify and share new ways that our customer base can leverage our platform

  • Build, drive and report on my team’s pipeline

  • Partner cross functionally with sales enablement, customer success, product, marketing, legal, finance, and ops to continue to drive efficiency in our sales team and sales process

  • Hire, coach, mentor and retain exceptional sales talent

Any tips for someone considering a career in Sales?

I think there will always be a place in Sales for highly curious, technically savvy people with strong oral and written communication skills.


Day in the Life


Coffee, tea, or nothing?

Coffee

What time do you get into the office?

Between 7:30 and 8:30 most mornings. 

What are three things that motivate you in your role?

  1. Helping people grow professionally

  2. Collaborating with customers that are energized by our platform

  3. Working in a market that is largely undefined with a platform that is the leader in that emerging space.

Every day is different, but can you outline what a typical day looks like for you?

  • Supporting account executives and managers on customer calls or face to face engagements

  • Working with account executives and managers to build effective account plans

  • Inspecting and building a rolling 90-day forecast/pipeline

  • 1:1s with managers and account executives

  • Interviewing or phone screen prospective candidates for our team

What time do you head out of the office?

Between 5 and 6:30 most nights.

Do you log back in at night or do you shut it down completely?  

I log back in at night.

Any productivity hacks?

Meditation. Sometimes you only need 10 minutes of silence to look at a problem in a different way.

What are the 3 apps that you can’t live without?

  1. Quick Base

  2. Spotify

  3. Audm

What professional accomplishment are you proudest of?

Seeing members of my team get promoted to run teams of their own here at QB.

Who do you admire?

I admire all members of my veteran extended family, but particularly those that are working day in and day out to overcome physical and/or psychological challenges that they developed overseas as a part of their service to our country.


Colin Barry is the Content Manager on VentureFizz. Follow him on Twitter @ColinKrash

Images courtesy of Neil Forbes

About the
Company

Unlock the potential of your digital operations with Quickbase's no-code platform.

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