Skillshare - The Secret Learning System of a Self Taught Entrepreneur

When: Tue November 13, 2012 9:30 pm

Organization: Skillshare

Location: Tufts, 419 Boston Avenue, Medford, MA

Website: http://www.skillshare.com/The-Secret-Learning-System-of-a-Self-Taught-Entrepreneur/1495242724/

 

About This Class (beginner level)

Have you ever wondered how much time you could save by learning faster?  How much more could you achieve if you could read 3 times faster, connect ideas forever, and never forget what you learn again?

Quick Facts on Learning:

  • People speak at 150 words per minute. They read between 200 and 300 wpm.
  • Every time you read a book, you invest 10-20 hours of your time. Studies show that people forget 95% of what they read after 2 months.

In this class, you will learn a revolutionary learning system that will  give you the biggest competitive edge there is. Forget the restrictions of time and energy and willpower and achieve more in less time with less effort.

  1. Double Your Reading Speed in 15 Minutes
    1. Blaze thru books with 4 simple techniques that will put you ahead of the pack
    2. Learn how speed reading actually IMPROVES understanding as well as speed
    3. The top speed reading software reviewed and rated.
  2. Master The Art of Notetaking
    1. Learn what is Mindmaping and why it will revolutionize how you learn
    2. Why notetaking is the biggest shortcut to memory retention
    3. How to reverse engineer the acknowledgment section to find an authors mentors
    4. 3 methods for collecting all the good ideas in a book so you can find them easily later.
  3. Unlimited Memory at Your Fingertips
    1. Why most memory systems  (and complicated Mnemonics) don’t work for real learning
    2. How  Einstein, JFK, and Obama use visual thinking to aid their memory
    3. 3 simple hacks to shortcut the rote learning process
    4. How to memorize speeches, mindmaps, and even entire books
    5. How to memorize 100 foreign vocabulary words a day
    6. What the Major System is and how you can use it to remember "unmemorizable" information